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Allies in Action: Ian Moore

This week, we’re celebrating the allies making the Civil Service a great place to work for LGBT+ people. Ian works for HM Prison and Probation Service. Here, Ian shares his thoughts on being an LGBT+ ally.

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By Sara Daunton

Civil Service allies Week

What’s your job role and where do you work?

I am a Senior Officer at HMP Pentonville.

How long have you been an ally?

I have been an LGBT ally for years but I only joined PiPP, the LGBT network in July 2017.

Why do you think it’s important to be an ally, and to have allies within an office?

I feel it is important to be an ally because I am able too. In my job my colleagues and I greatly rely on each other, sometimes in very dangerous situations. At that point in time I do not care if the person helping me is gay, trans or otherwise so why should it be a problem at other times. Because of this I decided to become an ally as the problems are not always with prisoners but sometimes staff. Being long in service I am known by most staff and I am confident enough to speak up if something needs to be challenged and can therefore be a good ally for any new of less confident staff.

What have you done to be a visible ally within your office or what do you plan to do?

It does not matter how brilliant you are as an ally if no-one knows who you are. I have a LGBT notice board which includes my name and where my office is, my desk area is adorned with official LGBT Network posters, I sent (with permission) a global email naming me and telling people how to contact me and/or join the network plus I had a stand at our recent staff wellbeing day.

Civil Service allies Week is a chance to highlight the important role of LGBT+ allies in the Civil Service.

Find out more about Allies Week